12
Apr

Pride: for whom?

As we celebrate Pride in order to protect our rights and promote acceptance, the LGBT community unites as one big family. In its daily reality, however, this group is not homogeneous, and a wide variety exists among its members. How does this alliance work out?

With the inclusion of the ‘T’ in the widespread abbreviation, the community expanded its reach from sexual identities to include gender identities. Since then, many additions have been suggested to make sure all the related minorities are included, such as Q for queer, A for asexual, I for intersex, P for pansexual, another G for genderqueer, and K for kink. Another approach has been to use the term GSM (Gender and/or Sexuality Minority) instead, because it is more universal and stable over time. Some use the word queer in a similar way, as meaning anything not cisgender and/or heterosexual.

The pooling of gender minorities and sexual minorities has become pretty normal, but when you think about it, it is actually quite peculiar. In their lives, members of these minorities are likely to face very different kinds of obstacles and might not identify with each other in many ways. Within the homosexual community there are plenty of differences; gay men and women often come together as separate groups. Sometimes the merging of these groups leads to tensions, because it feels like they have to discard their differences. In that sense, combining even more different groups into one community seems problematic.

Not so.

The beauty of Pride is that all individuals are encouraged to celebrate who they are. This creates a great feeling of unification between all of these subgroups. You could say it is the shared oppression and discrimination that bind us, or even force us into the same cage we want to escape from. You could also emphasize the strength we most certainly find in joining forces and the great variety of people that we embody and empower together. In the end, we all want to be included, and that is what Pride is all about; we strive to become one.

Read more about the development of the LGBT abbreviation here.

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28
Mar

We have won when we’re one
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2014 NYC Pride is organized in the name of the motto ‘We have won when we’re one’, and this shows precisely why LGBT pride events are relevant today. The past years have been incredible in terms of the improvement of the legal rights of LGBT citizens in New York, and the legalization of same-sex marriage in 2011 is a great milestone in this development. Since this achievement, some have had the urge to ask why Pride events are still organized; haven’t you gotten what you wanted? Is it really still necessary to have this parade? 

The answer lies in this year’s slogan: the battle of the gay community does not end at basic equal treatment under the law. Our goals in organizing these activities are not just political, because there are plenty of other barriers embedded into society that lead to the discrimination of LGBT people. Homophobia still exists, the heteronormative picture of what a family should look like still prevails, and particular ideas of masculinity and femininity still dominate our culture. Challenging these constructions is also part of our goals, because they have an impact on the way that people are treated. President Obama himself proclaimed: “More remains to be done to ensure every single American is treated equally, regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity”, and we couldn’t agree more.

Besides, New York may have legalized same-sex marriage, but the situation in other states has unfortunately not progressed as far yet. When looking at certain other countries, circumstances are even worse. New York Pride fulfills a leading role in promoting equality around the world, and even though we have reached some of our goals in our own state, our work is not done. Because New York is one of the world’s most prominent cities, what happens here will be noticed worldwide, and we make use of this when we celebrate and promote LGBT Pride. We unite to draw attention to legal rights and tolerance issues that still occur on a daily basis, and as long as the world is divided on the position of the LGBT community, we will keep Pride alive.

Want to read more?
- A blog by Professor Brian Mustanski on Psychology Today gives a good set of reasons why Gay Pride is necessary. He names the categories of community, courage and resilience, caring for others, creativity, and civic engagement:http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-sexual-continuum/201206/top-five-reasons-i-have-gay-pride-reason-1-community

- In 2002, sociologist Mary Bernstein wrote’ Identities and Politics: Toward a Historical Understanding of the Lesbian and Gay Movement’. This essay gives further insight into the goals of Pride beyond politics. 

02
Jul

NYC Pride VIP Rooftop Party - two female board members and a few of our amazing pier dancers #danceonthepier #nycpride #raintorainbows

NYC Pride VIP Rooftop Party - two female board members and a few of our amazing pier dancers #danceonthepier #nycpride #raintorainbows

28
Jun

gaywrites:

Remembering the Stonewall Riots of 1969. 

gaywrites:

Remembering the Stonewall Riots of 1969. 

28
Jun

comedycentral:

How will marriage defend itself without DOMA? Click here to watch Stephen Colbert’s reaction to yesterday’s historic Supreme Court decision.

(via logotv)

27
Jun

The Daily Show’s take on the Supreme Court’s historic decisions from yesterday. 

26
Jun

freedomtomarry:

We love Edie Windsor and love that DOMA will soon be DONE. Reblog to celebrate!

freedomtomarry:

We love Edie Windsor and love that DOMA will soon be DONE. Reblog to celebrate!

25
Jun

(Source: logotv)

25
Jun